Re-Keying With Class

In the mid-1900’s, the Chula Vista, California, elementary school (K-6) district, now comprising 40 or so schools, decided to modernize its older facilities, which dated back to the 1950s. Out went frayed electrical systems, dated plumbing, and ragged carpeting; in came color television, new furniture, fiber optics, and other new infrastructure. One aspect of the buildings remained distinctly low tech however; mechanical locks.

This standard lock-and-key system caused concern because in many cases the original keying still existed, and the administration had lost track of keys over the years. The addition of computer equipment, large-screen televisions, and other valuable technology at the refurbished schools made the issue all the more critical. “We wanted to be able to have control,” says Chris Mages, Chula Vista’s facility construction safety support manager.

In addition, Mages and his team of locksmiths wanted to reduce the time required to redo locking systems, re-keying an entire school is time consuming, Mages says.

Mages looked at InstaKey Lock Corporation, Denver, Colorado, which promised the ability to re-key and re-pin locks without hardware changes and offered comprehensive records management via special software. Mages spoke to InstaKey end users, such as a small school system in Branson, Missouri, which was pleased with the system.

To further assess the system, Mages asked for a demonstration and they agreed to test the system out on three schools that were being upgraded at the time. InstaKey provided the appropriate lock cores plus a master key for all doors in the schools, as well as two individual keys for all teachers: one to their specific classrooms and another that would open restricted common rooms, such as faculty lounges, rest rooms, and work rooms. Chula Vista locksmiths installed the cores.

The company also provided management software, which was installed on a PC. Key control is vested in Mages’ office. His staff members distribute keys and keep track of them using the software, which tracks all lock hardware and cut and uncut keys via a unique serial number and user name.

Mages says that the graphical user interface allows easy tracking of keys, schools, users, access permissions, and other criteria. For example, Mages can pull up any door in any school and quickly determine how many corresponding keys have been assigned and to whom, when, and so forth.

When a new key is needed, a school administrator calls Mages and submits a request. After checking the order, Mages passes it on to his locksmiths. The software identifies the type of key and cut needed and communicates that information to the locksmiths. (As a licensed end user, Mages keeps a secure supply of uncut key blanks.)

A locksmith’s job, however, doesn’t “close” until he or she records the key’s serial number, recipient, and date in the system. The software will indicate that the job is still open until that information is entered, and Mages regularly checks the status of these orders for anomalies. He also inventories blank keys by serial number. This process prevents keys from being cut and not recorded.

Unauthorized key reproduction is impossible, says Mages, because InstaKey’s key milling process is unique. “Another distributor can’t provide this key blank,” Mages says. In other words, the local locksmith won’t have the blank required to cut the key.

The three-school trial, which began in June 2000, went well, says Mages. As a result, InstaKey was added to another three schools that were being newly constructed-in December 2000, March 2001, and September 2001. Two previously modernized schools also switched over to InstaKey because of key problems there.

Despite the generally positive experience Mages has had, a few snags have cropped up. For example, at first, reports weren’t customized the way Mages wanted them. He wanted to see keys in sequential order and to have all master keys show up in a specific field. But the desired features didn’t exist at the time. An upgrade has since solved those issues.

Customer support has been superb, says Mages. In one case, the entire key system for one school-which included the set of all cores for every door in the school and the corresponding keys-got lost in the mail, InstaKey re-pined the system, a time-consuming process, and had it to Chula Vista in two or three days.

Chula Vista’s educational center-home of support staff such as maintenance and accounting-is in the process of installing InstaKey as well. In addition, five more schools will be modernized this summer, along with the remaining six within the next five years or so, and all will receive InstaKey. Mages and his staff will retrofit already modernized facilities that lack the system. Newly constructed schools will also incorporate InstaKey.

Mages says that the system has simplified tracking of misplaced items and has thus increased personal responsibility among school staff. Faculty approval of the new system has been high as well, Mages said.

Most important, the product has restored the district’s sense of key control in a system where keys are plentiful. With 150 doors per school, controlling keys is “a big deal,” says Mages. Now, for the eight schools that already have the system, he says, “I know for a fact where every master key is…and I know how many keys are out there.” And that’s the key to good access control.

Mr. Serani is the President of InstaKey Security Systems where he has directed the company’s focus on mechanical key programs for the last 20 years. Considered today to be one of the security industry’s experts in this cornerstone niche of security programs, Mr. Serani has published numerous articles and is often asked to speak to Loss Prevention forums in a variety of industries and government venues. He is most noted for his entertaining methods of relating real world key control issues to practical/proven solutions.

Starting a Mobile Locksmith Business

One of the best decisions I ever made in my 62 years of life on this planet was to become my own boss in a field that is never dull, always challenging, and intrinsically interesting. It was not an early decision. In fact it did not occur to me to enter this field until after I’d already spent ten years as a professional photographer. It came about in an odd way, as many serendipitous things do. But regardless of how it came to be, I consider that decision the one that paved the way for me to spend the rest of my working life in comfort and with a good measure of security.

I’ve since discovered that many people follow a similar course, turning to locksmithing only after finding themselves unhappy in other jobs. I’m not sure how or why so many discover this particular business when looking for an interesting career. In my case it was a natural progression from a rather unique part-time career I had fashioned for myself: That of installing simple door viewers and doing this door to door. Many times my customers would ask if I could install deadbolts for them while I was at it, and after turning down money a dozen or so times I finally got wise and visited a local locksmith supplier who sold me an install kit and a book of instructions. From what I can tell, others come across this idea by doing Internet searches for home businesses, because ultimately this qualifies as such if you, like I do, run it out of your home and structure it as a Sole Proprietorship. In any case, it is obvious that locksmithing has become a popular choice for a chance at self-employment.

After tiring of door to door selling (which didn’t take long to do) I hit upon the idea of cold calling. I was still thinking too small, but at the time I didn’t know it. Lesson Number One: Don’t do this. I was doing it back in 1981 or so when the stigma attached to such endeavors wasn’t quite so strong. I’m afraid that calling people out of the phone book and asking if they’d like to have deadbolts installed just would not fly in the present era of terrorism and business rip-offs.

Still, I owe to this period of hard knocks a good deal. I became efficient at installing locks, rekeying locks, and duplicating keys. It was during this one year period that I scrounged together enough money to purchase a small key duplicator and also a lock rekeying kit. I carried these items in the trunk of my car and carried them into my customer’s home when needed. I also purchased several boxes of the most common domestic key blanks and by the time I’d accumulated all this stuff my car’s trunk was crammed and I was wishing for more room. Also, and most important, I came to realize that driving around in an unmarked car and working out of the trunk was not lending itself well to my credibility.

Lesson Number Two: Start out with credibility. Purchase a small work van, or a large one if you can afford it. Buy signs or have signs painted on it. Use whatever lending power you have, may it be with banks or with family, to locate a used vehicle and have signage made up, even if this is in the form of magnetic signs. Of course all this suggests you start out as a legitimate business, and this is just my point. Create a name for your business (think long and hard about this, as you’ll lose any credibility you might initially gain if you keep changing it), have signs and forms and letterheads made up, and dive in.

There is, too, the question of legality. This is a hard subject to field, because the legality of doing business from one jurisdiction to another can differ widely, and even wildly. It is incumbent upon you to do the research and determine whether or not your jurisdiction requires a locksmith be certified, bonded, and/or licensed. You’ll almost certainly discover that licensing is the fundamental hurdle, and that is usually taken care of with the signing of a few forms and the payment of a small annual fee. Certification is something else. Not all jurisdictions require this. In my case I found that the state in which I was then living — Utah — did not require it. Nor was I required to be bonded, though I chose to do so for the added protection (it is widely and incorrectly thought that bonding protects the locksmith’s customer, whereas in fact it is the locksmith that is protected by the bond).

Lesson Number Three: Do the homework required to determine if acquiring a business license is all that is needed to establish your locksmith service. One phone call to your state’s Attorney General office will likely answer that question.

Once you have lined up an affordable vehicle and put a reasonably professional sign on it, you must begin outfitting it. This should, and must, be done before you begin advertising your services because if you are like I was at this point you know next to nothing about the business and not much more about the work. We will endeavor at this point to educate ourselves. Locksmithing is in point of fact one of the few professions left in this world in which a formal education is absolutely UNnecessary. I have spoken to very few professionals during my career who got to be that way through going to a ‘locksmith school’ or a college. This is certainly not to say that a formal education isn’t desirable. If you can afford it, if you have the means, then by all means take that route. This article is for those of you who can’t.

The vehicle you purchase will in large part determine how it is to be equipped. I’ve always preferred a full-size van (I’ve owned Ford, Chevy and GMC models during my career), but there are many locksmiths who just love the Astro Van or Safari Van made by GM. These minivans are popular with many different professions and are ubiquitous. You can undoubtedly find one in your price range. Either way, the first order of business is to erect a work bench that will give you as much space as possible. Best to have the bench on one side of the van and leave the opposite side for shelves or storage bins. Make it sturdy! There is nothing worse than a wobbly bench when you’re trying to rekey locks. Make it level for the same reason.

You’ll need a power source. It is excusable to string extension cords until you can afford something better, but bear in mind that this detracts from your professionalism. The ultimate is probably having a RediLine Generator that runs off your van’s 12V power. This is not a power inverter, it is actually a generator and it kicks out 110-115V power. They are wonderful sources of AC power and you can even run a bank of fluorescent lamps off one of these for your interior shop lighting. There are several models to choose from with varying outputs, but they are expensive. If you can locate a rebuilt, so much the better. A good inverter might do the trick if you can’t afford a RediLine, but be careful. Some key machines (and you’re going to have to have one) will not run with an inverter.

Power now available, you need to start out with at least a key duplicator on your bench and preferably, as well, a good code cutting machine. The latter is desirable but not necessary in the beginning unless you plan to launch directly into automotive locksmithing, in which case you’ll find it hard to get along without one. We’ll touch on that in a moment. Key machines are almost impossible to find used. You’ll likely end up buying a small HPC Speedex because they’re pretty much the least expensive good key duplicator around. Expect to pay around $500. Best if you include this in your initial loan. A key duplicator is bread and butter for any locksmith, mobile or otherwise, so don’t even think about starting up until you have one.

Equip yourself with a good rekeying kit. I’ve always preferred ‘universal’ kits because they do the work of dozens of other keyway-specific kits and they are easy to use. LAB makes the best of these, hands down. If you have the space, try to get a metal Classic Kit. If you don’t, you can start out with one of LAB’s Mini-Durex kits or, better, the miniature version of the Universal Kit (LMK-005 or LMK-003). You simply can’t rekey locks without one, and if you get a Universal you won’t be confined to keying up one or two brands . . . you’ll be able to handle them all. Don’t know how to rekey locks? Pick up an instruction manual on the Internet or at Amazon.com. They are available and this is one of the quickest locksmith skills to pick up. While you’re at it, buy at least one plug follower, a pair of pin tweezers, and ideally a pair of TruArc pliers. Over time you’ll accumulate more rekeying tools but these fundamentals are nearly essential.

Even before I was making money rekeying locks, I was being called to open cars. If you intend to advertise yourself as an emergency service, you’re going to have to take in this kind of lucrative work. Let me tell you now, this will be the easiest money you’ve ever made. It is well worth learning the skills required to open vehicles even if it means spending a couple of hundred dollars on tools and a good manual. Lockouts, at least in my case, virtually supported me for years. If you live in a medium to large city, count on getting lockout calls day and night even if you have only a tiny ad somewhere (a subject for later). There are many good lockout kits available online, to suit any budget, and the same goes for lockout manuals. Do a Google search for ‘car opening tools’ or ‘lockout tools’ and you’ll have no trouble finding suppliers. Are they legal where you live? Again . . . this is up to you to determine. The supplier cannot and will not endeavor to police this aspect of marketing, as it is simply not possible. I’m not advocating the purchase of anything that is not legal where you reside!

House and business lockouts are likewise lucrative sources of income for the locksmith, but these require different skills, different tools. Here is where it becomes necessary to learn the skill of lock picking — probably the most fundamental skill of the trade. It is not as easy to learn as car opening and lock rekeying, but it is by no means difficult, either. It requires practice and patience, and it requires good tools. Do not get stingy here. There are lots of cheap lock picking tools for sale. You’ll find them in automotive magazines, even. Stick with tools from the established firms like HPC, SouthOrd, Lockmasters, etc. Purchase a beginner’s set with a few picks and one or two tension tools for start, unless you have a big budget, then go for a set that will last you a while. Choice of spring steel or stainless steel is largely a matter of personal choice. Whichever one you start out with will likely be the kind you’ll stay with, because you’ll form an attachment to that type and you’ll train yourself to make the best of it. More important is the concept of practice. Buy Practice Locks. Once you’ve picked all the locks in your home you’re going to need more challenges, and now that Practice Locks are an accepted training aid in this field you’d do well to pick up a few of them. Practice until you can repeatedly pick the most challenging of your Practice Locks and then practice some more.

Did I mention that servicing lockouts will likely be the single most lucrative service you offer your customers? I thought so. Good!

There are other aspects to providing a locksmith service and among these is the ability to install locksets on homes and businesses. Primarily you’ll be asked to install deadbolts, but later on, as your business gets bigger, you’ll want to offer commercial business and real estate companies the option of replacing all their old lock hardware for newer more secure hardware. Again, practice is called for and you should be prepared to install a few unnecessary deadbolts and knobsets on doors in your own home that don’t need them. After doing this a dozen or so times, it will be easy to go to that first installation with confidence. You’ll need to add a few essential tools to your toolbox, such as a 1/2 inch drill, a couple of hole saws (2-1/8 inch and 1-inch), a 1/2 inch boring bit, and a good wood chisel. With these tools, you can install deadbolts in metal or wood doors. Complete installation kits are available and are the best choice if you can work them into your budget. Need instruction? Books galore available on Amazon.com or at any large scale bookstore in your city.

Once you’ve accumulated vehicle and the tools, and some knowledge gleaned from practice and reading, you can start thinking about getting your feet wet. The best way to start is the old fashioned way and that is to appeal to family and friends for work and for referrals. Network. Talk to everyone you know and let them know you’re serious about this and that you are available. Step two is to advertise and this is absolutely necessary, even if you start out only as a listing in the Yellow Pages. This is where 99% of the people who need a locksmith will look. Newspaper ads, flyers (Yucchhh!), direct mail and radio ads don’t work for locksmiths unless you have one enormous budget. Try to justify a small one-eight or one-quarter page Yellow Page ad if at all possible. Even in the face of huge competition, you will get calls and over time your name will be spread around, if you do a good job. Well, it will get spread around if you don’t, as well, but you’d do well to avoid that.

That’s how I did it. That’s how thousands of others have done it, give or take a detail or two. Be sure to cover the legal bases, because if you jump into it and find later that you’re acting outside the law, don’t come to me! This is part of your research. It is not that difficult to acquire a certification and satisfy local laws that may pertain to this business. If you keep the business small, and maintain yourself as a sole owner, you’re going to be profiting right off the bat because overhead with a mobile service is nil.